Download Current Religious Attendance Chart (.jpg): Free
  Download Marital Status chart (.jpg): Free
  Download Combined Chart (.jpg): Free
  Download PDF (.pdf): Free

Feels Scared, Afraid During Intercourse with Current Sexual Partner

The 1992 National Health and Social Life Survey shows that, of adults aged 18 to 59, those in intact marriages and those who worship weekly were least likely to report feeling scared or afraid during intercourse with their current sexual partner.

Religious attendance: Those who worship weekly (3 percent) were least likely to feel scared or afraid during intercourse with their current sexual partner, followed by those who worship less than weekly but at least monthly (5 percent), those who never worship (5.9 percent), and those who worship less than monthly (6.9 percent).

Marital status: Those in always-intact marriages were least likely (2.4 percent) to feel scared or afraid during intercourse with their current sexual partner, followed by those who were divorced and remarried (3.1 percent). Those who were divorced or separated (10.3 percent) and those who were always single (11.2 percent) were much more likely to feel scared or afraid.

Religious attendance and marital status combined: Those in intact marriages who never worship (.7 percent)[1] were least likely to feel scared or afraid during intercourse with their current sexual partner, followed closely by those in intact marriages who worship weekly (1.7 percent). Those in non-intact family structures and singles who worship weekly (4.9 percent) were more likely to feel scared or afraid, and those in non-intact family structures and singles who never worship (8.3 percent) were even more so.

Related Insight from Other Studies

Though the National Health and Social Life Survey included only adults, data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth shows those who worship weekly are least likely (14 percent) to have intercourse at or before age 14. Those who worship less than weekly but at least monthly (20 percent), those who worship less than monthly (24 percent), and those who never worship (26 percent) were much more likely to have had intercourse at or before age 14.[2] Sexual debut at such an early age may contribute to fear during intercourse

Among unmarried girls who have never had intercourse, those who were adamant about their unlikelihood to engage in premarital intercourse ("adamant virgins") were very likely (50 percent) to report that religious or moral reservations were their primary reason for abstaining, compared to a very small proportion (2 percent) of virgin girls who did not report that they were very unlikely to engage in premarital sex ("potential nonvirgins"). However, 15 percent of these potential nonvirgins reported that their primary reason for abstaining was fear of pregnancy, compared to only 7 percent of adamant virgins.[3]

Patrick F. Fagan, Ph.D. and Althea Nagai, Ph.D.

Dr. Fagan is senior fellow and director of the Marriage and Religion Research Institute (MARRI) at Family Research Council.

Althea Nagai is a visiting fellow at Family Research Council.



[1] This group being the "best" situation is unusual and worth noting because it breaks the standard pattern.

[2] Marriage and Religion Research Institute, "The Benefits of Religious Worship: Positive Outcomes Associated with Weekly Worship," (2011): 12. Available at www.marri.us/benefits-religious-worship. Accessed July 3, 2012.

[3] Edward S. Herold and Marilyn Shirley Goodwin, "Adamant Virgins, Potential Nonvirgins and Nonvirgins," The Journal of Sex Research 17, no. 2 (May 1981): 108-109.

X

Keep Me Informed!

Subscription form

 

 

Stay up to date with the best research in the field.

Get research updates delivered to your inbox FREE.

Research is usually released 1-3 times per month.

We respect your privacy and will never send spam. You can unsubscribe anytime.